MTSS at a Glance

MTSS at a Glance

Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) is a Response To Intervention Model that utilizes a three tiered system designed to help District U-46 schools provide students with high-quality instruction and interventions through academic and behavioral supports.

 

This three-tiered model provides differentiated instruction at a universal level to meet student needs. Students needing additional support are provided targeted intervention support in their area of need.   These supports consist of PBIS/RtI, Check In/Check Out (CICO) Social Academic Instructional Groups (SAIG), Mentoring, and RENEW.

 

It is important to understand that MTSS provides support for students and teachers alike. Both are empowered with the understanding that success for ALL is the primary, attainable goal. By developing trusting relationships, cultivating a positive and collaborative classroom environment, and supplying teachers with purposeful and engaging resources, the MTSS model is very powerful.

 

MTSS Critical Features

  • A comprehensive tiered model of support to address the full range of students’ academic and behavioral needs

  • Academic and behavioral performance data through progress monitoring utilized to inform and guide instructional decisions

  • Use of a team problem-solving model for planning and decision-making

 

Tier 1: Universal Core Instruction

  • Provided for all students

  • Instructional practices are evidence-based

  • Instruction is differentiated to meet all student needs

 

Tier 2: Targeted Small Group Interventions

  • Small group interventions are provided in addition to core instruction

  • Interventions are evidence-based programs and/or practices

  • Frequent progress monitoring to ensure student is responding and the intervention is effective

 

Tier 3: Intensive, Individual Interventions

  • Intervention support is provided with higher frequency and/or intensity one on one or with a very small group

  • Higher level intervention provided in addition to core instruction

  • Intervention tailored specifically to meet the needs of each student



MTSS - PBIS/RtI (Tier 1)

 

Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive systems approach for creating and maintaining safe and effective learning environments in schools, ensuring that all students have the social/emotional skills needed to achieve their success at school and beyond.

 

As the “behavioral side” of the Response to Intervention model, PBIS applies a three-tiered system of support and a problem-solving process to enhance the capacity of schools to effectively educate all students.

 

PBIS Is...

Prevention-based: Through instruction, comprehension and regular practice, all stakeholders use a consistent set of behavioral expectations.

Data-based: School teams within the building utilize school wide data and individual student data to determine which students are not responding to the teaching of the behavioral expectations. PBIS schools view it as an opportunity for re-teaching.

Community-based: PBIS offers supports for families, youth and schools.

Research-based: The school-wide PBIS process emphasizes the development of systems that support the adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices and procedures fitting within ongoing school reform efforts.

 

The principles and practices of PBIS are consistent with federal education mandates such as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004). The PBIS model is supported by the Illinois State Board of Education, promoting effective practices to benefit all children. PBIS integrates state school improvement initiatives including Systems of Support, Standards Aligned Curriculum and Response to Intervention to assist schools in meeting Illinois’ educational goals and mandates.

 

Check In/Check Out (CICO) (Tier 2)

 

The primary purpose of the CICO Intervention is to develop and cultivate positive relationships between students and teachers.

Why should I do it?

  • Improves student accountability

  • Increases structure, self monitoring, and student correcting behaviors

  • Improves student behavior and academics when other interventions have failed

  • Provides feedback and adult support on a daily basis

  • Improves and establishes daily home/school communication and collaboration

  • Improves student organization, motivation, incentive, and reward

  • Leads to maintenance free responsible behaviors, habits, and effort

When should I do it?

  • When a student has failed to respond to other interventions and general class management techniques and interventions

  • When a student has a difficult time establishing positive relationships

  • When a student is completing little to no work in class or at home

  • When a student is not participating, being involved, or taking part in the learning process

  • When a student has emotional issues, like anxiety, frustration, etc

  • When kids have attention, focus, and impulsivity issues

How do I do it?

  • The CICO intervention, is a highly effective research based intervention and can be changed and adapted to suit any school or situation

  • The program consists of students daily checking in with an adult at the start of school to retrieve a goal sheet and encouragement, teachers provide feedback on the sheet throughout the day, students check out at the end of the day with an adult, and the student takes the sheet home to be signed, returning it the following morning at check in

  • By implementing the CICO intervention, the student is able to establish positive, purposeful, and productive relationships with their teachers, eliciting successful academic and behavioral results

 

Social Academic Instructional Group (SAIG) (Tier 2)

 

  • Composed of small groups of students with one or more adult facilitator.
  • Skills are pinpointed for each group before teaching begins
  • Skills should be clear enough to both students and teachers to allow for teachers to   pre-correct, shape and reinforce for generalization in the classroom

Types of SAIG Groups

Skill-Building Groups:

 

  • Relieving Anxiety (Replacement behaviors and tools for reducing anxiety in the school setting) Test Taking, Social Scenarios, Self-Confidence

  • Pro-Social Skills (Replacement behaviors for avoidance, withdrawal, etc.) Friendship Skills/Social Skills

  • Simple Solutions Skills (Replacement behaviors for fighting, arguing, etc.) Conflict Resolution Skills/Anger Management Skills/Self Management Skills

  • Academic Behavior Skills (Replacement behaviors for getting out of seat, poor study habits, talking out during instruction, etc.) Study-Organizational Skills/Focus/Self-Management-Monitoring Skills/Responsible Decision-Making  

  • Grief Groups (Hands of Hope)

  • Girls Empowerment (Girl Scouts of America)
  • APEX (Math) (KWMS Faculty)

How SAIG Groups Work

  • Students will have a specialized DPR Card (Daily Progress Report) that will focus on the skills being taught in their SAIG Group. (Per Teacher Discretion)
  • Students participating in SAIG Groups will check out with teachers similar to CICO students.
  • Teachers will use CORRECTIVE language with students and not penalize them for the absence of skills present on their DPR Cards.
  • “You did not have your book today. Please remember to bring it tomorrow.”
  • “You were late for class today. Please be in your seat before the bell rings.”
  • “You shouted out while I was showing the problem on the board. Please raise your hand and I will call on you.”

Who Does the SAIG Groups? When do they meet?

  • The District has agencies that can come into our school and lead the groups
  • Teachers are also potential SAIG Group Leaders

  • SAIG Groups meet before, during, and after school

 

Mentor Program (Tier 2/3)

 

  • Composed of Kenyon Woods students with one or more adult facilitator
  • Skills are pinpointed for each student before teaching begins
  • Skills should be clear enough to both students and teachers to allow for teachers to pre-correct, shape and reinforce for generalization in the classroom

Four Types of Mentor Programs

  • One-to-One Mentoring (One-to-one Mentoring places one adult in a relationship with one student)
  •  Group Mentoring (This involves one adult mentor forming a relationship with a group of up to four students)
  • Team Mentoring (This involves several adults working with small groups of students, with an adult-to-student ratio of no greater than one to four)
  • Peer Mentoring (This involves students that may have been in a SAIG Group or a participant in our Check in and Check out Program. These peers will  help guide students through the mentoring process)

 

How The Mentor Program Works

 

Students will have a specialized DPR Card (Daily Progress Report) that will focus on the skills being taught during their Mentor session. Students participating in the Mentor Program will check out with teachers/mentors, similar to CICO students. Teachers will use CORRECTIVE language with students and not penalize them for the absence of skills present on their DPR Cards

 

  • "You did not have your book today. Please remember to bring it tomorrow.”
  • “You were late for class today. Please be in your seat before the bell rings.”
  • “You shouted out while I was showing the problem on the board. Please raise your hand and I will call on you.”

Who are the Mentors? When do they meet?

  • Kenyon Woods Middle School teachers and students.
  • Outside agencis/volunteers that can come into our chool to serve as Mentors.
  • Mentors may meet with their students before, during, and after school.

 

RENEW: Rehabilitation for Empowerment, Natural Supports, Education & Work

(Tier 3)

 

RENEW is a structured school-to-career transition planning and individualized wraparound process for youth with emotional and behavioral challenges. In D-46, RENEW is currently being provided by teachers, social workers, and  community-based providers. The model focuses on supporting each youth to design and pursue a plan for the transition from school to adult life. RENEW has substantially increased the high school completion, employment, and post-secondary education participation rates among our most vulnerable youth. The RENEW intervention empowers each participant become a resilient and powerful self advocate by setting goals and creating a team of people to provide support, encouragement, and direction.

Key Features

  • Self determination with a strength based approach

  • Personal futures planning

  • Creative and individualized school-to-career planning

  • Unconditional care

  • Building family and other natural and community supports

  • Wraparound

  • Systemic support and consultation

 

Outcomes

  • Improved educational outcomes (increased graduation rates, post-secondary education participation)

  • Increased employment rates

  • Improved functioning in school and in the community

  • Reductions in behavior problems in school and in the community (including reduced juvenile justice involvement)

  • High youth satisfaction rates

  • Increased youth self-determination and self efficacy skills

  • Studies from various cohorts (projects) support these outcomes