Hearing Impairment Information

Hearing Impairment Information

Effects of Hearing Loss

 

EFFECTS OF HEARING LOSS ON DEVELOPMENT:

 

It is well recognized that hearing is critical to sppech and language development, communication, and learning.  Children with listenning difficulties dit to hearing loss or auditory processing  problems continue to be an underidendified and underserverd population.

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The ealier a hearing loss occurs in a child's life, the more serious the effects on the child's development, communication, and learning.  Children with listening difficulties due to hearing loss or audtory process problems continue to be an underidentified  and underserved population.

 

The earlier hearing loss occurs in a child's life, the more serious the effects on the child's development.  Similaly, the earlier the problem is identified and intervention begins, the less serious the ultimate impact. 

 

There are four major ways in which heairng loss affects children:

 

1.  It causes delays in the development of receptive and expressive communication skills (speech and language).

 

2.  The language deficit causes learning problems that result in reduced academic achievement.

 

3.  Communications difficulties often lead social isolation and poor self-concept.

 

4.  It may have an impact on vocational choices.

Specific Efficts

 

Vocabulary

 

  • Vocabulary develops more slowly in children who have hearing loss
  • Children with hearing loss learn concrete words like cat, jump, five, and red more easily than abstract workds like before, after, equal to, and jealous.  They also have difficulty with function words like the, an, are, and a.
  • The gap between the vocabulary of children with normal hearing and those with hearing loss widents with age.  Children with hearing loss do not catch up without intervention.
  • Children with hearing loss have difficulty understanding words with multiple meanings.  For example, the word bank can mean edge of a stream or a place we put money.

 

Sentence Structure

 

  • Children with hearing loss comprehend and produce shorter and simpler sentences than children with normal hearing.
  • Children with hearing loss often have difficulty understanding and writing complex sentences, such as thos with relative clauses ("The teacher shom I have for math was sick today.") or passive voice ("The ball was thrown by Mary.")
  • Children with hearing loss often cannot hear word endings such as s or ed.  This nonagreement of subject and verb, and possessives.

 

Speaking

 

  • Children with hearing loss often cannot hear quiet speech sounds such as "s", "sh", "f", "t", and "k" and therefore do not include them in their speech.  Thus, speech may be difficult to understand.
  • Children with hearing loss may not hear their own voices when they speak.  They may speak too loudly or not loud enough.  They may have a speaking pitch that is too high.  They may sound like they are mumbling because of poor stress, poor inflection, or poor rate of speaking.

 

Academic Achievement